About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10
in newark, new jersey, and how it doesn't take that much effort to be there for a kid. and i see, and i was very happy during sandy, we were able to do some things through covenant house and in cooperation with some extraordinary people that linked in to raise a lot of money because it actually doesn't take that much money to give a person a doorway of hope. and the last thing i'll say on this is, you know, for me i get very upset because when i first became mayor, i had a metaphor that i clung to. i used to tell people because i'm such an optimistic, hopeful person, i used to tell people, i'm a prisoner of hope. when we walked through city hall, there were so many challenges, and i'd say we're prisoners of hope. we can do nothing but hope. now seven years later my metaphor's completely changed, because i see things happening in every sector of our city from the largest parks expansion in a century, from a -- in a down housing market, the creativity of my team to double housing. first time newark's population is actually going up. hotels built by newarkers, employing people in our city.
-- it was a snowy day in new york. i was coming here. i was a 20-something starting in newark, sloshing around on the slushy day, and i remember coming to a pool of slush that was deep, probably like shin deep, and i was looking at it. i see an older african-american woman pushing a cart, you know what i'm talking about? the metals, mesh-type cart. i'll help this woman, of course, through the slush ocean, and then this guy jumped up, a white conservatively dressed guy who i would have had, at that time, never assumed would have gone and walk in the slush in the shoes that are like my monthly allowance, slush in the shoes, brings the woman over to the side, smiles at the woman, woman smiles at him, and i witnessed that. my day changed. that made me open and more accepting and loving. you never know what an act can do to make that change. that's what the world needs desperately because we are stuck. you see this. there's no shortage of kids. i want to put covenant house out of business, frankly, because there's no shortage of kids right now in need. that shouldn't be the case. >> so we talked ab
will be mother and a business executive bid newark to be filled with adults to hurt kids to prioritize drugs, careers are a selfish interest why do people step up? the world wants to ignore these kids but people find a different path. why is that? >> i don't know. [laughter] i do not. it feels so good. to do the right they as much as inner-city people talk about under these definitions on a daily basis during hurricane sandy i was blown away by the extraordinary kindness people showed to their neighbors. when i was then a tough neighborhood a disabled woman rolled up to say i will give you two cases of water. she said i need them. i said you would be delivering water in your neighborhood? she said yes. we check out. we should have delivered water to hear -- to gerber she was delivering it to others. that is the degree of expression of humanity. i do know when somebody does something like that it inspires other people why when pitcher of a cop giving shoes become viral? we hunger for that. ways the uptick of giving during christmas time? the infectious spirit that should not be just one month
. gateway is a project that basically goes from just past newark into penn station, new york. it involves two new tunnels, a new portal bridge, some new tracks that go from, basically, lautenberg center all the way to the new two tunnels, and it also includes space within penn station for especially new jersey transit trains that don't have the same ability that long island railroad does to stop quickly and store or their trains on the, in the hudson yards or the west side yards. >> and where are you with that? >> we're in a planning stage. we -- some of the projects could move a little bit quicker than the others, and we included that in the after-sandy request of $336 million. and what we really need to do is make sure we secure a space under the hudson yards. it's about an 800-foot section at about $190 million. because once that, once that real estate development actually occur, it would close off the ability to get those two new tunnels in. the second thing we really need to do that was going to be done under arc but also would be done under gateway is to raise to a platform or to a
in the world, castaic in newark and paterson, of work there. a lot of these places. we don't talk about these places we don't talk about these places. the race through the air. making notes on all the stuff is going to write. this is an incredible moment. there being chased, the continental army. everyone is ready to give it up. to your point about the marble header's because i am listening tour when they get down to the delaware which there will soon cross, they get down to the dollar. the marble had a say, i know of a crossing, but every boat within 20 miles, get all the boats on the other side just in case we need them. that happened also when there were in new york city. we lose the time. we evacuate from manhattan to brooklyn. from brooklyn to manhattan witches' israel today. either way is illegal. you need permits. tried a couple times. when the evacuation, the same thing that happened. if he go back and look at the notes, if you look at stokes iconography, you see that the marble letters had said the beginning of the summer, can we have every single but the you have anywhere in t
. here is a business flooded out at the auto pier in newark. the shore, newark, all types of communities affected. i wanted to walk through these photos to give my colleagues and fellow americans the sense of the damage we have seen throughout the state. but what i have shown you still does not do justice to the full impact of the storm or the devastation people went through. every part of new jersey was affected by the storm and we need your help to recover. now, unfortunately, there are those voices who are saying the cost to help families rebuild and recover is too much, and that it should be reduced. that in this emergency, unlike many other similar emergencies in the past, we should do something smaller and wait to do the rest later. those who make such arguments could not be respectfully more wrong. you can't rebuild half of a path station, a little now and a little sometime more in the future. you can't permanently repair half of the mantoloking bridge. half a bridge is not a bridge at all. you can't hire a contractor to rebuild a house or restore half of a community. you need the
difficult time for so many families in newark, new jersey and connecticut. there were many loved ones lost during hurricane sandy. there were many children lost in connecticut. when a loved one is no longer around the dining room table when there are gifts that were bought that were not able to be given, it's a very sad time for our country. and what i am urging my colleagues to remember is what that loss feels like in their own states. we've seen so many tragedies this last year. we've seen so many disasters over the last several years. and as senator mikulski has said and senator schumer has said, this country always stands together in these times of disaster and grave need. whether it was hurricane katrina, we stood by that state that region immediately within ten days we delivered $60 billion of aid and relief to the families in need. we did the same thing for florida. hurricane andrew left devastation in its wake. we did the same thing when tornadoes hit joplin, missouri, and tuscaloosa, alabama. we stand by families in times of need. it's the job of the federal government to keep our
.com/booktv. clark in newark ohio, good afternoon to you. >> caller: can you hear me? >> guest: we sure can. treachery senator, i sent a few things to your staff. i want to talk about good science today. did you study those in medical school? >> guest: i have. phages are in the body right now. otherwise we would swell up and die because bacteria double in size every 20 minutes. so we have good vision and bad fascia. we can reduce -- [inaudible] by 30-$40 billion per year. that's called waste. wouldn't you call it? by using bacteria fascia. sent the same information to senator barrasso is also a medical doctor. i'd like to send some information to you about the reducing of cdo cost curve for medicare and medicaid by 2%, just 2% adoption on fascia will reduce the cost curve. over in north carolina as we speak there are lawsuits. some people went to a county fair and got e. coli, et cetera, and officials there, epidemiologist said i know nothing of this. well, we have cre, -- post that i think we got the point that i think senator coburn probably has a response for you. >> guest: well, i think
worried for many reasons, but one that really stood out for me was a dad from newark, delaware, whose own child is struggling with mental illness and who is working hard to try and find the resources to ensure appropriate care so that someday he isn't watching with horror on the television as the tragic actions of his child unfold. we think of the story shared online of the mother in idaho terrified that her own son has the capacity to kill some day. and yet, without the ability to give him the intensive medical care, treatment and intervention she believes he needs. across this country, mental health care is a growing challenge for us, between 2009 and 2011, states cut more than $2 billion from community mental health services. two-thirds of states have significantly slashed funding in these difficult economic times leaving parents seeking help for their mentally ill children often with nowhere to turn. mr. president, we must do better for all these parents, the parents who lost their children at sandy hook elementary, the parents who lost their children who were teachers and faculty, th
between journal square and 33rd street in manhattan. on november 12, we brought back service to newark. we have continued around-the-clock recovery efforts on november 26, path was resumed to the world trade center. as you noted, mr. chairman, i'm proud to say that just yesterday i joined employees for the inaugural run of restore hoboken services 33rd street on the westside of manhattan. with that we have restored at least limited service to all of the stations in our network. we learned during the storm that the ingenuity and dedication of our public service is unrivaled. in the first days after the storm one of our workers, tom all new, risked his own life to jump into several feet of murky flood waters to restart a pump by hand preventing further flood damage. tom o'neil and his own words was just doing his job, and it's that attitude and fortitude of all our past employees that continue to bring us back. we could have not, we could not have done this on their own. companies in fact a from all of the country felt in the recovery. in perl mississippi the employees of trilogy communicati
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10